Brexit is the Beginning, But a Second Revolution is Required

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On the 23rd June last year, a date that has become enshrined in the history of the British nation, the people of this country voted to leave the European Union in what has proved to be a momentous decision. The media, the politicians and the bankers all denied it was possible, ridiculing those who dared to dream, but dare we did and those dreams came true.

Or have they?

The question now is not whether or not Britain will in fact leave the European Union; politicians on both sides of the house are, for the most part, agreed that the will of the people must be respected. The real question is what will this Brexit look like?

Entrusted to the same old, stale political elite, Britain’s future outside the European Union will look much the same as its history inside. The same injustices that our political elite mostly blame on foreign bureaucrats in Brussels will simply manifest themselves in a slightly different manner.

Wages will remain as low as immigration remains high. The large corporations will continue to cream off the vast majority of Britain’s wealth. The issue of radical Islam will remain unaddressed, as the growing lawlessness of London’s streets becomes entrenched in British ‘cultural’ life. These are not issues that the political elite really care to address, for they in some way benefit from these deeply concerning issues.

Unfortunately, we must face the reality; those who hold power will only use it to preserve and advance the interests of themselves and their immediate interest groups. For the majority of them, that means the wealthy. For others, that means the causes of noisy minorities and shady lobbies. For very few, however, does that mean the ordinary folk of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

In order for the interests of those aforementioned peoples to be best served, they require true representatives in the corridors of power. They will never realise their national destiny with somebody else’s representatives, and nor should they trick themselves into believing that this is possible. For instance, it is simply not credible to assert that Jacob Rees-Mogg, as eloquent and often outlandish as he may present himself, is somehow a champion of ordinary folk.

What is required to ensure that the Brexit becomes a true “people’s Brexit” is in fact a second revolution, one that builds upon the foundations laid in that historic vote. Despite allegations of voter apathy, this is not an unrealistic demand, particularly when one considers that the most seismic revolutions of all time occurred not in a single event, but in various events across turbulent political times.

The French revolution for instance was not a single unified event, but a long series of revolutions over the course of a decade. Similarly, the Bolshevik revolution of October 1917 was only the culmination of the earlier revolutions in 1905 and February 1917, as opposed to the spontaneous eruption of popular sentiment that is often recounted by historians.

And it is without doubt true in this case, that the political revolution of June 2016 cannot be the singular, finite event that it is often seen as being, or the entire purpose of the vote will have been for nothing. It is imperative for those Brexit dreams of freedom, sovereignty and nativism to be realised, that there be a second revolution to replace the tired, old political class with true representatives of the people.

Footnote: “Revolution” in this instance should be inferred as political revolution, as opposed to the more unsavoury image of pitchforks and violence that may be conjured.

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