UK Police Force: Freemasonry & Privatisation

I’ve noticed two articles which have surfaced in recent days; firstly, a Guardian article concerning the outgoing chair of the Police Federation Steve White‘s comments on the presence of Freemasonry in the Police Force. According to White, said masons are blocking reform in the force. Secondly, there’s a growing rumour that the Tory government seeks to privatise elements of the police force, which has been expressed in a number of minor publications. I believe both these notions to be incredibly harmful to the police force, and I’m going to briefly set out why.

Whilst the original Guardian article is merely another example of liberals twisting a story to shill for minorities, it does indeed raise an interesting point; namely that freemasonry is a threat to the impartiality and effectiveness of the British Police Force. Those who enforce the law of the land must, absolutely and completely, have no conflicting interests, and it’s quite clear that being a mason would present such a conflict. Masons pledge always to protect fellow masons, come-what-may, thus a police officer who is also a freemason finds himself in a very conflicting position, should a fellow freemason warrant investigation for a crime.

There is evidence that this process has permitted high-profile individuals, both within and without the police force, to be effectively immune from investigation and prosecution. The famous phrase “friends in high places” comes to mind. It permits seemingly respectable members of high society, the McCann family for instance, to avoid due process in the wake of truly chilling crimes. It allows the rich and the powerful, the type of which Freemasonry is almost exclusively open to, to find immunity when the ordinary citizen would face due process for the same misdemeanour. In a society that aspires to be a meritocracy based on equality of opportunity, this is simply unacceptable.

Similarly, the presence of private capital in the law enforcement institutions is equally poisonous. There have been murmurs and whispers of late, to the effect that the current Tory government – itself infested with Freemasons – has intentions to privatise the police force, either partially or in full. This will undoubtedly be billed as a necessary cost-cutting measure, if it ever comes to pass, but the more likely motivation is rather more ideological i.e. the Tories’ unshakeable belief in free market economics.

The introduction of private capital into the law enforcement process would put the independence and impartiality of the police force in a highly perilous position. As we’ve already seen with aspects of NHS privatisation, and with past privatisations of the Mail Service, Prisons, the Railways and basic utilities, when a conflict arises between what’s right and what’s profitable, the latter inevitably emerges victorious. This is because there will always arise a situation whereby a conflict of interest exists between what’s right and what’s profitable. Putting the Police in the hands of those concerned with the latter will simply ensure that all of these conflicts are settled against public moral duty.

And who will lose out as a result of these inevitable victories for profit? Those without power, privilege or money, as usual. Whilst corruption undeniably exists at most levels of government, at least under state ownership this remains a crime, and a seldom practised one at that. Introducing private capital to the administration of the state, including the police force, effectively legalises this process, opening the door for mass corruption without recourse for the ordinary citizen. Is this a leftist view of capital? Unquestionably, but I stand by this assessment of the dangers involved with introducing private capital to matters of state.

More broadly, we can view the continued Freemason influence and the introduction of private capital in the context of Tory/New Labour neo-liberal theory. Since 1979, first with Thatcher, then Major, then Blair, Cameron and now May, Britain has been ruled by those with an un-moving belief in both neo-liberal economics, and the political class as a paternal structure guiding the uneducated masses through the complex, globalised world. Its these attitudes – the fetish for privatisation and the willingness to be steered by small cliques of secretive elites – that have destroyed this country, and given rise to the dire influences in institutions like the Police Force today. Through this neo-liberal approach, all the essential functions of a nation – water, electricity, mail, healthcare and so on – have been willingly delivered into the hands of profiteers, oftentimes foreign profiteers, whose only cause is capital growth, and whose last thought is the wellbeing of the citizen.

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Iran Protests: Why I’m Inclined to Support Them

Over the last few days, protests have erupted right across the Iranian nation. From economic hardship to religious conflicts, there are a multiplicity of grievances being aired in Universities, on the streets and in the cities, and this morning we awoke to the news that 10 protesters had been killed overnight by government forces. President Rouhani, to give him his due, has publicly acknowledged some legitimate economic grievances and has reaffirmed his citizens’ constitutional right to protest and criticise the government. However, as his government barred access to social media networks such as Telegram and Instagram, Rouhani warned citizens against “revolutionary action” and defacing public property, with special mention reserved for those who may seek to damage mosques or other religious institutions.

Now on first glance, this appears to be a classic CIA “democracy spreading” operation, the like of which we are accustomed to seeing in the middle-east. Given the United States’ (and Israel’s) open hostility to the current Iranian regime, I’d be more surprised if it transpired that the US weren’t covertly supporting the protesters in some way or another. But, even as President Rouhani has admitted, not all of the protesters are those being supported by a foreign power.

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Brexit is the Beginning, But a Second Revolution is Required

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On the 23rd June last year, a date that has become enshrined in the history of the British nation, the people of this country voted to leave the European Union in what has proved to be a momentous decision. The media, the politicians and the bankers all denied it was possible, ridiculing those who dared to dream, but dare we did and those dreams came true.

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Economic Socialism & Social Attitudes

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In politics, there are some ‘truths’ that are universally accepted to be self evident. The typically closed minded nature of human beings is never better reflected than in the manifestation of these truths, yet through this we Continue reading “Economic Socialism & Social Attitudes”

The House of Lords Is Obsolete, It Must Be Dismantled

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The debate surrounding the purpose and continued existence of the House of Lords (HoL) has been reignited in recent weeks after the second chamber voted to amend the government’s Article 50 Bill in order to protect the rights of EU migrants. There have been seemingly hasty calls from Brexiteers to abolish the House of Lords immediately, replacing it with an elected second chamber, but the truth of the matter is that this is long overdue. Continue reading “The House of Lords Is Obsolete, It Must Be Dismantled”

Hendrik Verwoerd: Architect of Apartheid

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The word apartheid is thrown around a lot in the sphere of geopolitical debate, often to denigrate certain regimes or government policies regarding racial matters, as it is associated with the evil white man subjugating the ethnic minority whom craves freedom. However, despite the frequent use of this Afrikaans word, apartheid itself in the context of 20th century South African politics is infrequently studied in any depth. It is simply portrayed as the white man illegally in charge of the black man, or baaskap as the concept was known in the Afrikaans language. In fact, the Continue reading “Hendrik Verwoerd: Architect of Apartheid”